Year 10 Subjects

Business and Legal Studies

Business provides opportunities for students to develop business knowledge and skills to contribute meaningfully to society, the workforce and the marketplace and prepares them as potential employees, employers, leaders, managers and entrepreneurs. Students investigate the business life cycle, develop skills in examining business data and information and learn business concepts, theories, processes and strategies relevant to leadership, management and entrepreneurship. They investigate the influence of, and implications for, strategic development in the functional areas of finance, human resources, marketing and operations.

Objectives

By the conclusion of the course of study, students will:

  • describe business environments and situations
  • explain business marketing concepts, strategies and processes
  • select and analyse business data and information
  • interpret business entrepreneurial relationships
  • create responses that communicate meaning to suit purpose and audience.

Legal Studies focuses on the interaction between society and the discipline of law and explores the role and development of law in response to current issues. Students study the legal system and how it regulates activities and aims to protect the rights of individuals, while balancing these with obligations and responsibilities. Students study the foundations of law, the criminal justice process and the civil justice system.

Objectives

By the conclusion of the course of study, students will:

  • comprehend legal concepts, principles and processes
  • select legal information from sources
  • analyse legal issues
  • evaluate legal situations
  • create responses that communicate meaning.

 

Dance

Dance is not only a fun and exciting subject, it is an essential medium in which students explore the complex elements of movement and express their inner creativity.  Dance plays a very important role in the culmination of processes, skills and disciplines.

The Year 10 Dance program focuses on dance as an aesthetic means of capturing and conveying ideas, images and feelings.  Dance uses the human body as the means of communication and leads learners to the realisation of the body’s potential as an instrument of expression.  As a discipline, dance develops confidence in personal physicality and promotes positive self-image.  As an art form, it is a universal mode of self-expression and communication.  Dance is also a recognised and popular form of social interaction and is a living expression of culture and history.

Dance offers a unique learning experience through participation in professional workshops conducted by specialists in the Dance industry.  In addition to this, students will also have the opportunity to attend excursions both during and after school time.  These excursions will provide the students with vital learning experiences such as viewing of live professional dance companies.

Drama

Learning in Drama involves students making, performing, analysing and responding to drama, drawing on human experience as a source of ideas. Students engage with the knowledge of drama, develop skills, techniques and processes, and use materials as they explore a range of forms, styles and contexts.

Through Drama, students learn to reflect critically on their own experiences and responses and further their own aesthetic knowledge and preferences. They learn with growing sophistication to express and communicate experiences through and about drama.

Course Outline

The course of Drama in junior grades is based on making and responding to dramatic forms. In year 10, students engage in these dimensions through the exploration of Children’s and Young Peoples Theatre.

Making in Drama involves improvising, devising, playing, acting, directing, comparing and contrasting, refining, interpreting, scripting, practising, rehearsing, presenting and performing. Responding in Drama involves students being audience members and listening to, enjoying, reflecting on, analysing, appreciating and evaluating their own and others’ drama works.

English

Year 10 English students will all have the opportunity to develop capabilities in Language, Literature and Literacy.  They will engage with a range of literary and non-literary texts to develop critical understanding. 

Students who have been selected for the English Extension course will study the same program but in great depth.  Selection and inclusion in the extension class is at the HOD’s discretion and requires that a predetermined minimum B level of achievement be maintained.

Objectives

By the conclusion of the course of study, students will:

  • evaluate how text structures can be used in innovative ways by different authors
  • explain how the choice of language features, images and vocabulary contributes to the development of individual style
  • develop and justify their own interpretations of texts
  • evaluate other interpretations of texts and analyse the evidence used to support them
  • listen for ways features within texts can be manipulated to achieve particular effects

Additionally, students will:

  • explain different viewpoints, attitudes and perspectives through the development of cohesive and logical arguments
  • develop their own style by experimenting with language features, stylistic devices, text structures and images
  • create a wide range of texts to articulate complex ideas
  • make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions, building on others’ ideas, solving problems, justifying opinions and developing and expanding arguments
  • demonstrate understanding of grammar, vary vocabulary choices for impact, and accurately use spelling and punctuation when creating and editing texts

Health and Physical Education

  • This unit is designed for students who are considering studying Physical Education (General Subject) or Sport and Recreation (Applied Subject) in the senior school. Students will be required to participate in a range of physical activities and complete written tasks related to the physical activity studied.
  • The focus of unit 1 will be for students to recognise and explain basic exercise physiology principles such as how the musculoskeletal system operates, how energy systems function, training methods and training principles used to improve performance. Students will demonstrate specialised movement sequences and movement strategies in the selected physical activity.
  • The focus of unit 2 will be for students in groups to focus on planning and then evaluating physical activities that will be implemented within the wider school community, e.g. “House Culture” experiences, designing innovative physical activities or designing an alternative school cross country course. They will also be exposed to skills, drills and modified games specific to international sports such as Futsal or Gridiron. Students will be required to demonstrate specialised movement sequences and movement strategies in the selected physical activity.
  • Feedback will be provided to students as to suitability for the senior programs on offer.

Humanities

This course covers two discrete strands of study – History and Geography.

History: explores the making of the modern world from WWII to the present day.  It was a period of social upheaval and conflict which challenged the established order of the world. Nationalism and imperialism were redefined.

Geography: helps students to build a holistic understanding of the world.  Students learn to question why the world is the way it is, reflect on their relationships with and responsibilities for that world and propose actions designed to shape a socially just and sustainable future. 

The History/Geography Extension: course covers the same topics as History/Geography; however this course work is covered with greater rigor and depth.

The skills covered in History and Geography contribute to the overall academic wellbeing of all students by aiding their ability to collect, evaluate, analyse and interpret information and suggest possible solutions to challenges facing the world in the past, present and the future.  These skills can be applied in everyday life, across other subjects, in tertiary study and at work.

Japanese

The study of languages contributes to the general education of all students. Learning to communicate in two or more languages is a rich, challenging experience of engaging with and participating in the linguistic and cultural diversity of our interconnected world.

The Australian Curriculum recognises Australia’s distinctive and dynamic migration history. Language learning builds upon students’ intercultural understanding and sense of identity as they are encouraged to explore and recognise their own linguistic, social and cultural practices and identities as well as those associated with speakers of the language being learnt.

Learning languages also develops students’ overall literacy, strengthening literacy-related capabilities that are transferable across learning areas.

Objectives

Content descriptions aim to ensure that students develop the skills, knowledge and understanding required to communicate in the target language, to understand language and culture and to develop an intercultural capability in communication.

Mathematics

Year 10 Mathematics has been developed to prepare students to function mathematically in everyday life, as well as to prepare students for each step of their education and career pathway.

Objectives

By the end of Year 10, students will be able to recognise the connection between simple and compound interest and solve problems involving linear equations and inequalities. They will make the connections between algebraic and graphical representations of relations. Students will solve surface area and volume problems relating to composite solids and recognise the relationships between parallel and perpendicular lines. They will compare data sets by referring to the shapes of the various data displays and describe statistical relationships between two continuous variables. They will also apply trigonometry to solve right-angled triangle problems.

Media Art

Students are introduced to styles and techniques of contemporary photographers.  Theme based tasks and deadlines apply to the products produced for assessment.  These include on location shooting using a DSLR camera and manipulating images in Adobe, Photoshop CC and Bridge; filming and editing in Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

Course Outline

  • Research Photographers
  • On Location Shoot using DSLR cameras
  • Photo-shoot on location
  • Stop Motion Film

Music

Music is an integral part of everyday life serving self-expressive, celebratory, social, cultural, political and educational roles. As a powerful educative tool, music contributes to the holistic development of the individual. A study of music assists students in understanding and heightening the enjoyment of the arts in their lives and the musical heritage of a range of cultures.

Studying music fosters students’ expression of their creativity and individuality through composing and performing music to communicate feelings, thoughts and ideas. Students become adaptable and innovative problem-solvers, making informed decisions and, as inquirers, develop their ability to deconstruct and critically evaluate. The discipline and commitment of music-making builds students’ self-esteem, personal motivation and independence as well as providing opportunities for the refinement of their collaborative teamwork skills.

Partnership Program: Students enrolling into Music have the opportunity to undertake further study in the Instrumental Music program. 

Objective

The focus of this unit is to develop students’ understanding and appreciation of various musical genres through immersion into these via three assessment avenues:

  • Musicology (Analysis)
  • Composition
  • Performance

Science

Science prepares a student for life in our rapidly changing technological society. The “Greenhouse Effect”, the Ozone Layer Problem, Nuclear Waste, Microwave Ovens, the list goes on. We are bombarded by new technology. Science gives the tools to deal with it. Science is fun and practically based. We do experiments to explain the world around us. In Science, we build life skills.

Students selected for the science extension class will study the above mentioned topics in greater depth. Extra activities may be included e.g., titrations, microscopy, tertiary visits and industry excursions as well as a variety of STEM activities—hosted both outside and within the school. Students undertaking science extension should definitely consider expanding their studies in later years by enrolling in the many pathway courses that later become available, such as the Head Start programs offered by Southern Cross University and the Go Griffith Go Health programs offered by Griffith University—see Partnership Program section in Senior Secondary Subject Information Guide. Selection and Inclusion in the extension course is by HOD and teacher recommendation and requires a predetermined minimum level of achievement to be attained and maintained.

Objectives

By the conclusion of the course of study, students will:

  • Describe and explain scientific concepts, theories, models and systems and their limitations.
  • Analyze evidence
  • Interpret evidence
  • Investigate phenomena
  • Communicate understandings, findings, arguments and conclusions.

A course of study in Science promotes open- mindedness, imagination, critical thinking and intellectual inquiry — skills that prepare students for local and global citizenship, and for lifelong learning across a wide range of contexts.

Technology – Digital

This subject gives students the opportunity to gain transferable technology skills for using a computer as a problem-solving and communication tool. Students will be able to explore various aspects of digital technologies.

Digital Technologies is structured to provide foundation skills for entry into both senior subjects and Certificate courses, which allow for further study pathways at university of TAFE in this field.

Students will gain an understanding of how to code a video game within a group environment, touch on 3D modeling techniques, investigate how to edit videos and document production techniques.

This course promotes open-mindedness, imagination, creative thinking and intellectual inquiry — skills that prepare students for local and global citizenship, and for lifelong learning across a wide range of contexts.

Technology – Engineering principals and systems

Engineering principles and systems prepares a student for life in our rapidly changing technological society.

Engineering principles and systems, architecture, building, construction and manufacturing using environmentally friendly resources, —the list goes on in an ever-expanding world. We are bombarded everyday by new technology and the solutions it can solve.

Engineering principles and systems is part of the Design Technologies suite of subjects and as such helps students to develop the tools to deal with it. Design Engineering is fun and practically based. We do inquiries and investigations to improve the world around us. In Design and Industrial Technology, we build life skills.

The study of Engineering principles and systems will provide students with an integrated approach to certain aspects of engineering systems, design and the manufacturing process. Engineering principles and systems will lead to skills involving systems and design and the link between digital technologies and the manufacturing process.

Objectives

By the conclusion of the course of study, students will:

  • Design and manufacture items using technological links, concepts and theories.

  • Model systems using design and information communication technologies.

  • Interpret and explain the manufactured and built environment.

  • Investigate phenomena to do with information technology.

  • Communicate understandings, findings, arguments and conclusions.

A course of study in Design and Technology promotes open- mindedness, imagination, creative thinking and intellectual inquiry — skills that prepare students for local and global citizenship, and for lifelong learning across a wide range of contexts.

Technology – Food Studies

Hospitality is concerned with the extent to which students meet the general objectives of practical skills and application, planning and decision making and knowledge as set down in the syllabus.  Assessment will reflect the schools policy which is school based, continuous and criteria based.

Course Overview

Hospitality units are designed to assist students in their selection and suitability for areas of study in the Senior Hospitality options. During the course of study in each unit students will sample aspects of the relevant senior course and be provided with scaffolded learning experiences in preparation for senior phase studies. Students considering Certificates II and III in Hospitality, and/or Authority Registered Hospitality in the senior school, are strongly encouraged to select Introduction to Hospitality.

Objectives

Hospitality involves learning for work, learning about work and understanding the nature of work, by the conclusion of the course of study, students will:

  • Learn for work involving developed work related knowledge, practices and dispositions
  • Learn about work emphasis, understandings about food service and the settings and conditions that characterize workplaces. Highlighting the benefits of work to individuals and communities.
  • Understanding the nature of hospitality work involves critically reflecting on and analyzing the sociocultural, economic and legal forces that influence the ways society values the service industry.

Technology – Graphics and Design

Graphics and Design is part of the Design Technologies suite of subjects and focuses on underpinning industry practices and drafting processes required to produce the technical drawings used in a variety of industries, including building and construction, engineering and furnishing. It provides a unique opportunity for students to experience the challenge and personal satisfaction of producing technical drawings and models while developing beneficial vocational and life skills

A course of study in Graphics and Design can establish a basis for further education and employment in a range of roles and trades in the manufacturing industries. With additional training and experience, potential employment opportunities may be found in drafting roles such as architectural drafter, estimator, mechanical drafter, electrical drafter, structural drafter, civil drafter and survey drafter.

Objectives

By the conclusion of the course of study, students should:

  • describe industry practices in drafting and modelling tasks
  • demonstrate fundamental drawing skills
  • interpret drawings and technical information.

A course of study in Graphics and Design promotes open- mindedness, imagination, creative thinking and intellectual inquiry — skills

Technology – Health and Nutrition

Food and nutrition is concerned with the extent to which students meet the general objectives of practical skills and application, planning and decision making and knowledge as set down in the syllabus.  Assessment will reflect the schools policy which is school based, continuous and criteria based. 

Course Overview

Junior Secondary units in Food and Nutrition provide students with an introduction to the potential of food technology, food science future and the opportunity to investigate food production, food processing techniques and the latest food technology innovations. The focus is on the practical application of food production, workshop skills and packaging. Each unit reflects outcomes to be reached in Junior Secondary thus providing a clear understanding of both practical and theoretical expectations for future study pathways.

Objectives

Food and Nutrition endeavors to improve the knowledge of the interrelationship between good nutrients and health and impacts it can have on quality of life and community wellbeing.

The objective of this subject is to prepare students for the practical aspects of everyday life and uses practical everyday examples to develop core skills, extension writing and interpretation of information in preparation for future career choices.

In line with the aims of senior schooling, Food and Nutrition seeks to develop confident, self-directed, knowledgeable people.

Technology – Industrial Tech

Industrial Technology and Design is a Design Technology subject and as such prepares a student for life in our rapidly changing technological society. Furniture making, architecture, building, construction and manufacturing using environmentally friendly resources,—the list goes on in an ever-expanding world. We are bombarded everyday by design problems and the solutions to solve them. Design Technology develops the tools to deal with it. Design Technology is fun and practically based program, through inquiry and investigations to improve the world around us. In Design Technology, we aim to build life skills.

The study of Industrial Technology and Design as part of the Design Technology suite of subjects provides students with an integrated approach to use the design, engineering and manufacturing processes to effectively and safely make designed solutions. Industrial Skills will lead to skills involving graphic design, engineering and the manufacturing process.

Objectives

By the conclusion of the course of study, students will:

  • Design and manufacture items using technological links, concepts and theories.
  • Interpret and explain the manufactured and built environment.
  • Communicate understandings, findings, arguments and conclusions.

A course of study in Industrial Skills promotes open- mindedness, imagination, creative thinking and intellectual inquiry — skills that prepare students for local and global citizenship, and for lifelong learning across a wide range of contexts.

Tech – Textiles and Food

Food and Textiles is part of the Design and Technologies learning area. Students will have the opportunity to learn about the production of food and fibres, their use and the environment in which they live. Students will be assessed under two strands: knowledge and understanding; and processes and production skills.

Course Overview

Technology Food and Textiles provide students with an introduction to the potential of a future in the textile or fashion industry and the opportunity to investigate fibre and fabric production, processing techniques and the latest industry innovations. The focus is on the practical application of constructing textile articles using hand techniques, the sewing machine and the overlocker. The food component’s focus is on the practical application of food production, developing safe kitchen skills and promoting healthy food choices.

Objectives

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • explain how people working in design and technologies occupations consider factors that impact on design decisions and the technologies used to produce products, services and environments.
  • identify the changes necessary to designed solutions to realise preferred futures they have described.
  • produce designed solutions for identified needs or opportunities, and evaluate the features of technologies and their appropriateness for purpose in both the food and textiles technologies contexts.

Visual Art

Students intending to undertake Visual Art in Years 11 and 12 should select Year 10 Visual Art.  The semester-long unit reflects the nature of the depth and breadth of arts practice in both tertiary institutions as well as industry.  This integration unit provides an active participation in multiple arts media (2D, 3D and time-based media) modelled on the requirements of the Senior Visual Arts course.  The core concepts of Year 10 Visual Art stem from the fundamental artistic and creative practices embedded within Years 8 and 9 Art studies.

Students should be aware the philosophical underpinnings involved in a study of contemporary art at a senior level requires a maturity inherent in their behaviour and responsibility.  Much of the work undertaken is processed in a studio situation where students are required and trusted to work semi autonomously.

Course Outline

Year 10 Visual Art explores Post-modern art, introducing students to the styles and techniques of contemporary image making while encouraging autonomous studio-style working. 

Students will create a folio of either experimental mixed-media works leading towards a major sculptural or mixed-media work or a major film based work that reflects their understanding of post-modern philosophy.  Students will consider more than the canvas in the presentation of their work.

A wide range of media and image/sculpture making techniques are experienced including ink, graphite, acrylic, shellac, charcoal, contè, pastel, impasto, surfacing, wax, ceramics, assemblage, printmaking, in addition to gaining basic understanding of the digital programs and processes of Adobe Creative Suite – Photoshop, Premiere Pro, After Effects and Illustrator.